About Village Concepts

At Village Concepts, we recognize that the true foundation of a home starts with the community of people residing there—living, learning and growing together. This vision is reinforced by the fact that Village Concepts’ managed properties maintain some of the highest overall occupancy rates in the senior housing industry.

Our Story

Steven, Rick, and grandson Stuart have actively managed our operations for over 40 years. When Bill Brown opened his first home for senior citizens, the concept of assisted living as we know it today did not exist. Through trial, error and a great deal of tenacity, Bill forged the new frontier and helped shape the industry as a whole. His early commitment is typical of the Brown family’s hard work ethic and one of the reasons that Village Concepts has weathered the many challenges of the senior care industry for over 50 years.

As one of the oldest and largest providers of assisted living in Washington State, we are dedicated to creating a successful senior living environment where residents can remain active and engaged in their communities. While Village Concepts did not invent assisted living, the Brown family has certainly played a large role in pioneering its creation.

Our Mission
Our Mission

Our Mission

Our mission is to enhance and maximize the value of our clients’ real estate investments while providing exceptional housing and services for our residents. We believe that because this principle forms the foundation of our strategy, both internally and externally, we can create an environment that surpasses our customers’ expectations and makes a positive impact on the communities we serve.
Our Team
Our Staff

Our Team

For more than 40 years the Village Concepts Team has been providing exceptional housing, support, and services for seniors across the state of Washington. Our hard-working team takes the time to learn about our residents so that they can fulfill your needs and your wildest dreams! Contact Us

In the news...

object(WP_Query)#2724 (52) { ["query"]=> array(3) { ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["posts_per_page"]=> int(3) ["paged"]=> int(1) } ["query_vars"]=> array(64) { ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["posts_per_page"]=> int(3) ["paged"]=> int(1) ["error"]=> string(0) "" ["m"]=> string(0) "" ["p"]=> int(0) ["post_parent"]=> string(0) "" ["subpost"]=> string(0) "" ["subpost_id"]=> string(0) "" ["attachment"]=> string(0) "" ["attachment_id"]=> int(0) ["name"]=> string(0) "" ["pagename"]=> string(0) "" ["page_id"]=> int(0) ["second"]=> string(0) "" ["minute"]=> string(0) "" ["hour"]=> string(0) "" ["day"]=> int(0) ["monthnum"]=> int(0) ["year"]=> int(0) ["w"]=> int(0) ["category_name"]=> string(0) "" ["tag"]=> string(0) "" ["cat"]=> string(0) "" ["tag_id"]=> string(0) "" ["author"]=> string(0) "" ["author_name"]=> string(0) "" ["feed"]=> string(0) "" ["tb"]=> string(0) "" ["meta_key"]=> string(0) "" ["meta_value"]=> string(0) "" ["preview"]=> string(0) "" ["s"]=> string(0) "" ["sentence"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["fields"]=> string(0) "" ["menu_order"]=> string(0) "" ["embed"]=> string(0) "" ["category__in"]=> array(0) { } ["category__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["category__and"]=> array(0) { } ["post__in"]=> array(0) { } ["post__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["post_name__in"]=> array(0) { } ["tag__in"]=> array(0) { } ["tag__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["tag__and"]=> array(0) { } ["tag_slug__in"]=> array(0) { } ["tag_slug__and"]=> array(0) { } ["post_parent__in"]=> array(0) { } ["post_parent__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["author__in"]=> array(0) { } ["author__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["ignore_sticky_posts"]=> bool(false) ["suppress_filters"]=> bool(false) ["cache_results"]=> bool(true) ["update_post_term_cache"]=> bool(true) ["update_menu_item_cache"]=> bool(false) ["lazy_load_term_meta"]=> bool(true) ["update_post_meta_cache"]=> bool(true) ["nopaging"]=> bool(false) ["comments_per_page"]=> string(2) "50" ["no_found_rows"]=> bool(false) ["order"]=> string(4) "DESC" } ["tax_query"]=> object(WP_Tax_Query)#3136 (6) { ["queries"]=> array(0) { } ["relation"]=> string(3) "AND" ["table_aliases":protected]=> array(0) { } ["queried_terms"]=> array(0) { } ["primary_table"]=> string(19) "wp_yxwczhor9q_posts" ["primary_id_column"]=> string(2) "ID" } ["meta_query"]=> object(WP_Meta_Query)#3131 (9) { ["queries"]=> array(0) { } ["relation"]=> NULL ["meta_table"]=> NULL ["meta_id_column"]=> NULL ["primary_table"]=> NULL ["primary_id_column"]=> NULL ["table_aliases":protected]=> array(0) { } ["clauses":protected]=> array(0) { } ["has_or_relation":protected]=> bool(false) } ["date_query"]=> bool(false) ["request"]=> string(328) " SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_yxwczhor9q_posts.ID FROM wp_yxwczhor9q_posts WHERE 1=1 AND ((wp_yxwczhor9q_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (wp_yxwczhor9q_posts.post_status = 'publish' OR wp_yxwczhor9q_posts.post_status = 'acf-disabled'))) ORDER BY wp_yxwczhor9q_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 3 " ["posts"]=> array(3) { [0]=> object(WP_Post)#2705 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(14021) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "2" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2022-08-08 21:37:56" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2022-08-08 21:37:56" ["post_content"]=> string(11505) "[caption id="attachment_14022" align="alignleft" width="640"] Woodland Village’s eight centenarians. Back, from left to right: Louise Carpenter, 100; Agnes Wasson, 101; Dottie Docherty, 100; Eileen Wikokff, 101; Shirley Nelsen, 101 and Glenna Ralff, 100. Front: Jim Van Ackren (left), 100 and Pearl Miller, 103.[/caption]

Woodland Village in Chehalis celebrated the lives of eight centenarians on Monday. Ahead of the celebration, The Chronicle was able to interview four of them as they reflected on their more than 100 years of life and shared their experiences.

Louise Carpenter, 100, was born on April 15, 1922, in Bellingham. She grew up on a “little” farm in Snohomish County. In Carpenter’s telling, her childhood was a simple one.

“I didn’t do very much,” she said.

Carpenter recalled what it was like when her family first got electricity on their farm when she was 7 years old.

“I can remember when we got electricity because I was in awe of the electric light,” Carpenter recalled.

When the Great Depression began in 1929, Carpenter said her family learned to deal with the new economic realities.

“Well, we just did without,” Carpenter said. “I don’t remember suffering much, but we didn’t need much.”

After World War II began in late 1941, Carpenter began working in the shipyards of Puget Sound as a sheet metal worker. As the war progressed, she was given the opportunity to learn how to fly.

“It was really exciting to me,” Carpenter said. “We had to go to Spokane because there was no flying on the West Coast because of the war.”

After the war ended in 1945, Carpenter got a job as an aircraft communicator at the airport in Toledo, where she lived for 50 years. Carpenter managed to live a remarkably independent life well into her later years, living on her own until she moved to Woodland Village last July at the age of 99.

Today, Carpenter, who had one daughter with her husband, is the grandmother of four grandchildren.

[caption id="attachment_14024" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Centenarian Shirley Nelson smiles alongside Peggy Brooks during a celebration at Woodland Village in Chehalis on Monday.[/caption]

Shirley Nelsen, 101, was born in Rochester 10 minutes after midnight on July 2, 1921. Like other people her age, Nelsen lived through the Great Depression, experiencing levels of poverty common to that era.

“At that time we were quite young, but I remember my mom telling people later on that she robbed our piggy bank to buy bread,” Nelsen said.

Nelsen’s father was a mechanic and often had to move his family around to find work during the Depression, eventually moving to logging camps in California where they had no electricity and had to use kerosene lamps for lighting. But in 1932, Nelsen’s family was dealt a blow when an earthquake struck the state.

“We moved back up after a week of aftershocks and so my dad said, ‘We’re going home,’ and so we moved back up to Washington again (even though he didn’t have a job),” Nelsen said.

As a young adult, Nelsen took a civil service exam at the Chehalis Post Office, after which she was hired as a secretary for the surgeon general’s office in Washington D.C., arriving in time for the beginning of World War II.

“I can remember vividly where I was when I heard the announcement that Pearl Harbor had been attacked,” Nelsen said. “I was in my room and had the radio on when they announced the attack.”

Nelsen remembered the difficulties of life during the war, when wartime restrictions meant major changes in people’s daily lives.

“We did what we had to do, like conserving gasoline, and we had stamps to buy sugar and meats so we prioritized things because you couldn’t go in the grocery store and buy anything you wanted,” Nelsen said. “We did whatever we could do to help.”

Around 1943, Nelsen moved home to be near her family again. She said she wanted to be closer to her loved ones since “you didn’t know what was going to happen” during the war.

Thinking about the world events she’s lived through, Nelsen said two of the most notable were the death of Thomas Edison and the moon landing, in part because of her longstanding interest in technology and the future. 

“I was always interested in what’s going to happen in the future. We used to go to movies that were about the future, which we’re living in now,” Nelsen said. “The moonwalk of course was very exciting for me.” But Nelsen also found some aspects of advances in technology frightening. She called life during the Cold War “scary” because of the spread of nuclear weapons. “Your imagination could kind of take off about what could happen,” Nelsen said.
When asked if she had any advice to share with young people, Nelsen stressed honesty.
“Work hard, travel, learn how other people live and tell the truth,” Nelsen said. “‘Tell the truth, pay your debts and learn to say no,’ my father used to say. That should about cover it.” In her long life, Nelsen has been blessed with two daughters, six grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. [caption id="attachment_14030" align="aligncenter" width="1500"] Centenarian Eileen Wikoff poses for a photo alongside her daughter, Linda Fenske, during a celebration at Woodland Village in Chehalis on Monday.[/caption] Pearl Miller, 103, was born on Dec. 9, 1918 in Muskogee, Oklahoma. The oldest resident at Woodland Village, Miller’s descriptions of the major events of her life were often direct and to the point. Describing her experiences during the Great Depression and World War II, she said both were “horrible, just horrible,” adding of the Great Depression, “We had nothing.” Miller told The Chronicle her favorite memory was visiting the World’s Fair in 1936, but that was hardly the only exciting experience of her life. “I’ve been to Europe and Asia, I think I’ve been to Africa,” Miller said. She has three children and many grandchildren. “Grandchildren?” Miller asked, “Now you’ve put me on the spot.” Asked if she had any advice for young people, Miller had a couple of suggestions. “Pay attention to your grandparents and don’t spend your money just because you have it. Save it,” Miller said. “My folks didn’t have any money. They didn’t have anything.” [caption id="attachment_14025" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Centenarian Glenna Raiffe smiles while talking to friends and family during a celebration at Woodland Village in Chehalis on Monday.[/caption] Glenna Ralff, 100, was born on March 31, 1922, in Hibbing, Minnesota. During World War II, Ralff served in the Navy, helping provide medical care before becoming a pharmacist mate while stationed in Brooklyn, New York, where she lived in barracks with other young women. After the War ended, she attended Washington State University and studied business, eventually getting a job as a hostess for Trans World Airlines. “I didn’t like the idea of getting out of school and working in an office,” Ralff said. Ralff recalled events from her life, including the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963. “I remember the Kennedy assassination. I saw him get shot (on the news),” Ralff said. “That was shocking. That’s all you can say is shocking.” Another event Ralff remembered was the moon landing. “It was an unusual experience, not many people went to the moon,” Ralff said. But for the many world events she’s witnessed in her 100 years, she still continues to be surprised, pointing to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine as something that has shocked her. “I think this war with (Russian President Vladimir) Putin has been the most shocking thing in the last few years,” Ralff said. “It’s been unbelievable.” She’s also had memorable personal experiences, including driving a dogsled team while living in Alaska. She even recalled once driving her dog team through the snow with her 18 month old daughter. “I was just an outdoor person,” Ralff said, giving a simple explanation for her outdoor ventures. In her long life, Ralff has had the privilege of seeing her family grow. Through her two daughters, her family now spans several generations, including her two great-great granddaughters. [caption id="attachment_14028" align="aligncenter" width="1500"] Agnes Wasson, who celebrated her 102nd birthday this week, talks with her grandchildren and great grandchildren during a birthday celebration at Woodland Village in Chehalis on Monday.[/caption] Carpenter, Nelsen, Miller and Ralph were joined by their fellow Woodland Village centenarians on Monday for a celebration of their long lives. The names of the other four centenarians, who were either unavailable or chose not to be interviewed by The Chronicle, are Eileen Wikoff, Jim Van Ackeren, Agnes Wasson and Dottie Docherty.
" ["post_title"]=> string(91) "100 Years and Counting: Woodland Village in Chehalis Celebrates Lives of Eight Centenarians" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(90) "100-years-and-counting-woodland-village-in-chehalis-celebrates-lives-of-eight-centenarians" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2022-08-08 21:42:06" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2022-08-08 21:42:06" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(36) "https://villageconcepts.com/?p=14021" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#3133 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(13985) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "2" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2022-06-01 16:14:25" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2022-06-01 16:14:25" ["post_content"]=> string(5124) "[caption id="attachment_13986" align="aligncenter" width="1703"] Larry Libby poses for a portrait on May 5 in Sedro-Woolley. Libby, a longtime blood donor, will be honored by Bloodworks Northwest with a virtual blood drive called Larry’s Legacy. Photo by Oliver Hamlin / Skagit Valley Herald[/caption] SEDRO-WOOLLEY — Larry Libby donated blood for the first time in 1952. In the past 70 years, he has donated about 725 units of blood, plasma and platelets. “I don’t really know why I started or why I continued,” said the 88-year-old Libby, who with his wife of 59 years Joann lives at Village Concepts in Sedro-Woolley. “I guess you give it once, you just feel you need to give it and give it and give it.” Blood banks are fortunate Libby has felt that way. His AB-positive blood type is rare, with only 3% of the population having AB-positive or AB-negative blood. Those with the AB blood type are considered universal plasma donors, meaning their plasma — or liquid portion of their blood — can be given to all patients regardless of blood type. Bloodworks Northwest’s Hannah McNutt said having Libby donate as regularly as possible “means the world to patients in need.” In honor of Libby, Bloodworks Northwest is hosting what it is calling Larry’s Legacy from June 22 to June 29. To participate, schedule an appointment at a local Bloodworks Northwest location and inform staff the donation is on behalf of Village Concepts in support of Larry’s Legacy, or simply provide the code of 7964. Appointments can be made online at schedule.bloodworksnw.org or by calling 1-800-398-7888. More information is available at bloodworksnw.org. Libby has been more than happy to donate blood over the years. “It has never been difficult,” he said. “If I can make it until December, it will be 71 years. I’m going to be calling it quits pretty soon.” McNutt said frequent donations, especially among those with rare blood types, are important. It all has to do with the shelf life of blood. “When someone donates whole blood, they are ineligible to donate again for 56 days,” McNutt said. “Red cells have a shelf life of just 42 days and platelets have a shelf life of just five days. “What this means is that by the time someone is eligible to donate again, their blood has already been used by a patient in need. I’m taking a guess here, but I would say within just a few weeks if not a month, their blood has already been transfused. Donors need to return frequently so we can avoid lows in our inventory.” For Libby, answering the call to donate blood started while he was serving as a mess cook at the Navy’s Aviation Fundamental School in Jacksonville, Florida. There, the 18-year-old Maine native heard about a blood drive and decided to participate. While in the Navy, Libby served on four ships in the Pacific Fleet, spent time on Midway Island and witnessed atomic bomb tests at Bikini Atoll. “The best ship I was ever on was the Coral Sea,” he said. Libby also worked as a weatherman while stationed in Alaska and even wintered over at McMurdo Station, Antarctica. The work Libby did often meant he and his wife didn’t see each other — or speak — for months on end. “I didn’t talk to my wife for 13 months (while in Antarctica),” he said. “But that’s OK. She understood the situation. “I ended up going (to Antarctica) twice. The second time was during the Antarctic summer and after I spent several months in Hawaii recovering from a bad shoulder.” Rather than taking an assignment at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Libby retired in 1972. He received a master’s degree in business through a Central Michigan University extension program in Florida. Libby said he didn’t donate blood regularly while the Navy, but that changed when he retired as a lieutenant at the age of 37. And it was when he arrived in Mount Vernon in 1978 that his donation schedule ramped up. “When I was living in Mount Vernon, I drove down to Bellevue 104 times to give 94 units of plasma,” Libby said. “Then I shifted back to platelets and I drove to Everett. “Most of my giving has been in platelets and plasma, which tend to be more acceptable by people. The next time I go, I’m set up for platelets. I have done a lot of that.” In his wallet, Libby carries reminders of his past. In addition to a list of baseball umpires he was at one time responsible for assigning to games during his 20 years as an umpire and assigner, there is a small, faded photo of one of his early plasma donations. Donating blood takes less than an hour from check-in to post-donation cookie, and having a specific blood type is not required to book an appointment. Bloodworks urges donors to schedule appointments at one of its 12 donor centers and pop-up locations. “It’s not hard,” Libby said. “It just takes time.”" ["post_title"]=> string(67) "For 70 years, Skagit County man has answered the call to give blood" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(66) "for-70-years-skagit-county-man-has-answered-the-call-to-give-blood" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2022-06-01 16:14:25" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2022-06-01 16:14:25" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(36) "https://villageconcepts.com/?p=13985" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#3061 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(13968) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "2" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2022-05-23 17:32:08" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2022-05-23 17:32:08" ["post_content"]=> string(7643) "[caption id="attachment_13969" align="aligncenter" width="1500"] Virginia Krausch smiles while holding Maria, a pygmy goat, at Woodland Village Concepts of Chehalis Thursday afternoon. Photo by Jared Wenzelburger[/caption]

Cascade Pygmy Goat Association Brings Furry Friends to Village

" ["post_title"]=> string(89) "Pygmy Goats Steal the Spotlight at Woodland Village in Chehalis During Visit With Seniors" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(89) "pygmy-goats-steal-the-spotlight-at-woodland-village-in-chehalis-during-visit-with-seniors" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2022-05-23 17:39:05" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2022-05-23 17:39:05" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(36) "https://villageconcepts.com/?p=13968" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post_count"]=> int(3) ["current_post"]=> int(-1) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(false) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#2705 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(14021) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "2" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2022-08-08 21:37:56" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2022-08-08 21:37:56" ["post_content"]=> string(11505) "[caption id="attachment_14022" align="alignleft" width="640"] Woodland Village’s eight centenarians. Back, from left to right: Louise Carpenter, 100; Agnes Wasson, 101; Dottie Docherty, 100; Eileen Wikokff, 101; Shirley Nelsen, 101 and Glenna Ralff, 100. Front: Jim Van Ackren (left), 100 and Pearl Miller, 103.[/caption]

Woodland Village in Chehalis celebrated the lives of eight centenarians on Monday. Ahead of the celebration, The Chronicle was able to interview four of them as they reflected on their more than 100 years of life and shared their experiences.

Louise Carpenter, 100, was born on April 15, 1922, in Bellingham. She grew up on a “little” farm in Snohomish County. In Carpenter’s telling, her childhood was a simple one.

“I didn’t do very much,” she said.

Carpenter recalled what it was like when her family first got electricity on their farm when she was 7 years old.

“I can remember when we got electricity because I was in awe of the electric light,” Carpenter recalled.

When the Great Depression began in 1929, Carpenter said her family learned to deal with the new economic realities.

“Well, we just did without,” Carpenter said. “I don’t remember suffering much, but we didn’t need much.”

After World War II began in late 1941, Carpenter began working in the shipyards of Puget Sound as a sheet metal worker. As the war progressed, she was given the opportunity to learn how to fly.

“It was really exciting to me,” Carpenter said. “We had to go to Spokane because there was no flying on the West Coast because of the war.”

After the war ended in 1945, Carpenter got a job as an aircraft communicator at the airport in Toledo, where she lived for 50 years. Carpenter managed to live a remarkably independent life well into her later years, living on her own until she moved to Woodland Village last July at the age of 99.

Today, Carpenter, who had one daughter with her husband, is the grandmother of four grandchildren.

[caption id="attachment_14024" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Centenarian Shirley Nelson smiles alongside Peggy Brooks during a celebration at Woodland Village in Chehalis on Monday.[/caption]

Shirley Nelsen, 101, was born in Rochester 10 minutes after midnight on July 2, 1921. Like other people her age, Nelsen lived through the Great Depression, experiencing levels of poverty common to that era.

“At that time we were quite young, but I remember my mom telling people later on that she robbed our piggy bank to buy bread,” Nelsen said.

Nelsen’s father was a mechanic and often had to move his family around to find work during the Depression, eventually moving to logging camps in California where they had no electricity and had to use kerosene lamps for lighting. But in 1932, Nelsen’s family was dealt a blow when an earthquake struck the state.

“We moved back up after a week of aftershocks and so my dad said, ‘We’re going home,’ and so we moved back up to Washington again (even though he didn’t have a job),” Nelsen said.

As a young adult, Nelsen took a civil service exam at the Chehalis Post Office, after which she was hired as a secretary for the surgeon general’s office in Washington D.C., arriving in time for the beginning of World War II.

“I can remember vividly where I was when I heard the announcement that Pearl Harbor had been attacked,” Nelsen said. “I was in my room and had the radio on when they announced the attack.”

Nelsen remembered the difficulties of life during the war, when wartime restrictions meant major changes in people’s daily lives.

“We did what we had to do, like conserving gasoline, and we had stamps to buy sugar and meats so we prioritized things because you couldn’t go in the grocery store and buy anything you wanted,” Nelsen said. “We did whatever we could do to help.”

Around 1943, Nelsen moved home to be near her family again. She said she wanted to be closer to her loved ones since “you didn’t know what was going to happen” during the war.

Thinking about the world events she’s lived through, Nelsen said two of the most notable were the death of Thomas Edison and the moon landing, in part because of her longstanding interest in technology and the future. 

“I was always interested in what’s going to happen in the future. We used to go to movies that were about the future, which we’re living in now,” Nelsen said. “The moonwalk of course was very exciting for me.” But Nelsen also found some aspects of advances in technology frightening. She called life during the Cold War “scary” because of the spread of nuclear weapons. “Your imagination could kind of take off about what could happen,” Nelsen said.
When asked if she had any advice to share with young people, Nelsen stressed honesty.
“Work hard, travel, learn how other people live and tell the truth,” Nelsen said. “‘Tell the truth, pay your debts and learn to say no,’ my father used to say. That should about cover it.” In her long life, Nelsen has been blessed with two daughters, six grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. [caption id="attachment_14030" align="aligncenter" width="1500"] Centenarian Eileen Wikoff poses for a photo alongside her daughter, Linda Fenske, during a celebration at Woodland Village in Chehalis on Monday.[/caption] Pearl Miller, 103, was born on Dec. 9, 1918 in Muskogee, Oklahoma. The oldest resident at Woodland Village, Miller’s descriptions of the major events of her life were often direct and to the point. Describing her experiences during the Great Depression and World War II, she said both were “horrible, just horrible,” adding of the Great Depression, “We had nothing.” Miller told The Chronicle her favorite memory was visiting the World’s Fair in 1936, but that was hardly the only exciting experience of her life. “I’ve been to Europe and Asia, I think I’ve been to Africa,” Miller said. She has three children and many grandchildren. “Grandchildren?” Miller asked, “Now you’ve put me on the spot.” Asked if she had any advice for young people, Miller had a couple of suggestions. “Pay attention to your grandparents and don’t spend your money just because you have it. Save it,” Miller said. “My folks didn’t have any money. They didn’t have anything.” [caption id="attachment_14025" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Centenarian Glenna Raiffe smiles while talking to friends and family during a celebration at Woodland Village in Chehalis on Monday.[/caption] Glenna Ralff, 100, was born on March 31, 1922, in Hibbing, Minnesota. During World War II, Ralff served in the Navy, helping provide medical care before becoming a pharmacist mate while stationed in Brooklyn, New York, where she lived in barracks with other young women. After the War ended, she attended Washington State University and studied business, eventually getting a job as a hostess for Trans World Airlines. “I didn’t like the idea of getting out of school and working in an office,” Ralff said. Ralff recalled events from her life, including the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963. “I remember the Kennedy assassination. I saw him get shot (on the news),” Ralff said. “That was shocking. That’s all you can say is shocking.” Another event Ralff remembered was the moon landing. “It was an unusual experience, not many people went to the moon,” Ralff said. But for the many world events she’s witnessed in her 100 years, she still continues to be surprised, pointing to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine as something that has shocked her. “I think this war with (Russian President Vladimir) Putin has been the most shocking thing in the last few years,” Ralff said. “It’s been unbelievable.” She’s also had memorable personal experiences, including driving a dogsled team while living in Alaska. She even recalled once driving her dog team through the snow with her 18 month old daughter. “I was just an outdoor person,” Ralff said, giving a simple explanation for her outdoor ventures. In her long life, Ralff has had the privilege of seeing her family grow. Through her two daughters, her family now spans several generations, including her two great-great granddaughters. [caption id="attachment_14028" align="aligncenter" width="1500"] Agnes Wasson, who celebrated her 102nd birthday this week, talks with her grandchildren and great grandchildren during a birthday celebration at Woodland Village in Chehalis on Monday.[/caption] Carpenter, Nelsen, Miller and Ralph were joined by their fellow Woodland Village centenarians on Monday for a celebration of their long lives. The names of the other four centenarians, who were either unavailable or chose not to be interviewed by The Chronicle, are Eileen Wikoff, Jim Van Ackeren, Agnes Wasson and Dottie Docherty.
" ["post_title"]=> string(91) "100 Years and Counting: Woodland Village in Chehalis Celebrates Lives of Eight Centenarians" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(90) "100-years-and-counting-woodland-village-in-chehalis-celebrates-lives-of-eight-centenarians" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2022-08-08 21:42:06" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2022-08-08 21:42:06" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(36) "https://villageconcepts.com/?p=14021" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["comment_count"]=> int(0) ["current_comment"]=> int(-1) ["found_posts"]=> int(174) ["max_num_pages"]=> float(58) ["max_num_comment_pages"]=> int(0) ["is_single"]=> bool(false) ["is_preview"]=> bool(false) ["is_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_archive"]=> bool(false) ["is_date"]=> bool(false) ["is_year"]=> bool(false) ["is_month"]=> bool(false) ["is_day"]=> bool(false) ["is_time"]=> bool(false) ["is_author"]=> bool(false) ["is_category"]=> bool(false) ["is_tag"]=> bool(false) ["is_tax"]=> bool(false) ["is_search"]=> bool(false) ["is_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_comment_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_trackback"]=> bool(false) ["is_home"]=> bool(true) ["is_privacy_policy"]=> bool(false) ["is_404"]=> bool(false) ["is_embed"]=> bool(false) ["is_paged"]=> bool(false) ["is_admin"]=> bool(false) ["is_attachment"]=> bool(false) ["is_singular"]=> bool(false) ["is_robots"]=> bool(false) ["is_favicon"]=> bool(false) ["is_posts_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_post_type_archive"]=> bool(false) ["query_vars_hash":"WP_Query":private]=> string(32) "d674a4bb20872695b683b6e6cad7f86b" ["query_vars_changed":"WP_Query":private]=> bool(false) ["thumbnails_cached"]=> bool(false) ["allow_query_attachment_by_filename":protected]=> bool(false) ["stopwords":"WP_Query":private]=> NULL ["compat_fields":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(15) "query_vars_hash" [1]=> string(18) "query_vars_changed" } ["compat_methods":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(16) "init_query_flags" [1]=> string(15) "parse_tax_query" } }

100 Years and Counting: Woodland Village in Chehalis Celebrates Lives of Eight Centenarians

Woodland Village in Chehalis celebrated the lives of eight centenarians on Monday. Ahead of the celebration, The Chronicle was able to interview four of them as they reflected on their more than 100 years of life and shared their experiences. Louise Carpenter, 100, was born on April 15, 1922, in Bellingham. She grew up on…

Read More

For 70 years, Skagit County man has answered the call to give blood

SEDRO-WOOLLEY — Larry Libby donated blood for the first time in 1952. In the past 70 years, he has donated about 725 units of blood, plasma and platelets. “I don’t really know why I started or why I continued,” said the 88-year-old Libby, who with his wife of 59 years Joann lives at Village Concepts…

Read More

Pygmy Goats Steal the Spotlight at Woodland Village in Chehalis During Visit With Seniors

Cascade Pygmy Goat Association Brings Furry Friends to Village The staff at Woodland Village in Chehalis works to make sure the seniors who reside there are always the center of attention. But on Thursday afternoon, a group of furry visitors stole the show. Four pygmy goats — Sue and Rain, both 3 years old, and…

Read More